I loose
Myself on and
Lose myself
In you….

4 & 5 / Squelf (or The Lone Miser Who Observes Her Hidden Treasure by Chamomile Demure

4 & 5 / Squelf (or The Lone Miser Who Observes Her Hidden Treasure by Chamomile Demure

How the Grinch Really Stole Christmas: The Untold Story of the Devil’s Incredible Comeback by Chamomile Demure

How the Grinch Really Stole Christmas: The Untold Story of the Devil’s Incredible Comeback by Chamomile Demure

Looking Far West: The Search For The American West In History, Myth, And Literature by Chamomile Demure

Looking Far West: The Search For The American West In History, Myth, And Literature by Chamomile Demure

Skating By Vince Guaraldi by Chamomile Demure

Woah ur blog is stunning ! I actually love it ! It would be quite cool if you'd check out my blog out too ! Ily

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Thank you so much, and I certainly shall.

                    “Some years ago, strolling through the outskirts of Granada, I heard a village woman singing her child to sleep. I had always been aware of the acute sadness of our country’s cradle songs; but I had never felt it so vividly as then. Approaching the singer to make note of the words, I observed that she was a pretty Andalusian, happy and without the slightest hint of melancholy; but a living tradition worked in her and she faithfully executed its commands, as though listening to the ancient, imperious voices echoing in her blood. Since then I have tried to collect lullabies from every corner of Spain; wishing to know how my countrywomen lull their children to sleep, and after a while I gained the impression that Spain utilizes its saddest melodies and most melancholy texts to tinge her children’s first slumber.” 
—Federico García Lorca

                    “Some years ago, strolling through the outskirts of Granada, I heard a village woman singing her child to sleep. I had always been aware of the acute sadness of our country’s cradle songs; but I had never felt it so vividly as then. Approaching the singer to make note of the words, I observed that she was a pretty Andalusian, happy and without the slightest hint of melancholy; but a living tradition worked in her and she faithfully executed its commands, as though listening to the ancient, imperious voices echoing in her blood. Since then I have tried to collect lullabies from every corner of Spain; wishing to know how my countrywomen lull their children to sleep, and after a while I gained the impression that Spain utilizes its saddest melodies and most melancholy texts to tinge her children’s first slumber.” 

—Federico García Lorca

By CF

By CF

                    “What’s great about being transgender is that you’re born with a natural religion. It applies almost across-the-board, no matter what culture, or economic group, or nation that you’re from: you’re almost automatically a witch.”
—Antony Hegarty

                    “What’s great about being transgender is that you’re born with a natural religion. It applies almost across-the-board, no matter what culture, or economic group, or nation that you’re from: you’re almost automatically a witch.”

—Antony Hegarty